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Less dogmatic phlegm, more sincerity. Welcome to a new era of marketing.

If you’re a big brand in Australia, have a look at your comms. And ask yourself, is my brand true? Am I advertising a borrowed emotion, or am I advertising the magic within the product? 

Dogma.

It’s everywhere isn’t it?

Especially in the realm of marketing and marketing science.

Do more brand.

Do more emotion.

Do less discounting.

Do both.

Invest more.

Invest less.

Reach matters most.

Relevance trumps reach.

Brand purpose is dead.

And so on. And on.

We’re in danger of codifying ourselves out of a job.

Because we’re all peddling the same blurb. The same long and the same short of it. All campaign strategies appear to have defaulted to a cul-de-sac of faux emotional paste.

If you’re a big brand in Australia, have a look at your comms. And ask yourself, is my brand true? Am I advertising a borrowed emotion, or am I advertising - as Bill Bernbach put it so cogently - the magic within the product?

Meanwhile a new breed of brand magic is emerging. Marketing that doesn’t bullshit, but delivers a true benefit oriented message. That’s good for people, planet and profit too.

John Grant has just published his awesome Greener Marketing - a sequel to his The Green Marketing Manifesto - to help us understand how to deliver marketing that doesn’t just look good, but does good. More good-wash? Far from it. Concrete case studies from the obvious like Patagonia and Innocent drinks. And the less known, like Karma Cola and BlackRock Investments.

Grant reveals how businesses can build their own sustainable marketing shift in 15 steps. And offers a tone of practicable counsel as well as inspiration.

His is a code built from sincerity, not cynicism. For well intentioned, more effective marketing.

Grant writes,

‘Cynicism leads to manipulation and to the overconsumption that got marketing a bad name. What is worse in recent decades those cynical approaches have been applied to eco and cause campaigns. The public are getting better at seeing through phony attempts. As Pepsi discovered with its Kylie Jenner video (attempting to co-opt the Black Lives Matters protests). Cynical fake purpose campaigns are starting to look like the old royal courts of Europe dressing up like shepherds. And rightly, when caught out, they face the guillotine. Marketing cynicism stems from company culture, from how politics work, what is and isn’t up for discussion, who gets rewarded and for what, the example leaders set and (often) the lack of voice for the rest. ‘

The less cynical we are, the less dogmatic we become.

Less dogma invites more innocence.

More innocence invites greater creativity.

And the world needs a whole heap of that right now if we’re going to get out of the mess that is 2020.

Over and out.

Words by Managing Partner, Carl Ratcliff

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If you’re a big brand in Australia, have a look at your comms. And ask yourself, is my brand true? Am I advertising a borrowed emotion, or am I advertising the magic within the product?